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with supreme court justice anthony kennedy. and then yale law professor talks about how president obama stance on same-sex marriage. this week on "newsmakers, "president of the service employees international union talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for in budget negotiations. can see "newsmakers" at 10:00 a.m. >> what about if the soviet union announces tomorrow but if we attack cuba, it is going to be nuclear war? >> serious things here, we're .oing to be uneasy p >> something may make these people should off. -- shoot it off. i would want to make my own people very alert. >> it is a fascinating moment. it is amazing that eisenhower tells him to have a people alert. of course people are alert. kennedy laps. then he says, -- laughs. then he says, hang on tight. they're able to joke a little bit with each other. especially during this crisis, the had a sense of how lonely it is to occupy that office and i were getting all kinds of a device, good advice, a lot of faulty advice, which kennedy was. eisenhower knew all about faulty military advice. he is able to speak with supreme a
gave you the opportunity to define for millions of people what you want the law to be and you can't. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. i'm bill o'reilly, thanks for watching this special edition of the factor. we begin tonight with three genuine american war heros. chris kyl and former seal marcus la tremendously. all have remarkable stories to tell us. we begin with sergeant meijer. >> before we get to the book, and what you did and what you were honored for, recently, the u.s. command in afghanistan forbade american and nato troops from patrolling with our afghan allies. that is just stunning to me after 11 years in the theater. what do you think about that? >> i couldn't imagine. i was living withvi these guys, these afghans and i trusted them with my life. you know, i was so close to them that i was as close to them as i wasth the marines. >> bill: so and you were out in the forward bases so you had the elite afghan troops with you, right? >> i mean, they are just like a regular platoon. they weren't elite or special reports forces
who makes the laws. caller: president obama could not put anything in there before his term going out. i have been following this for years. usually the incoming president has bills that the previous president left. on this president's way out, congress would not let him put any deals in. they put enough in there to finish his term. host: the president has been reelected and will be back in next year. but i appreciate the call. i want to point to an obituary in the new york times today on the death of warren redmon. he dies at age 82. the sometimes combative centrist republican senator from new hampshire. you will be seeing those obituaries in several papers today. coming up next, a top supreme court reporter david savage will join us to talk about some of that the-profile cases an accord will be taking up. and later, phyllis bennis will take a closer look at where u.s. troops are deployed around the world, and not just in the middle east. first, turning back to warren rudman. he was a moderate republican senator from new hampshire. he was 82 years old when he died. he sat down with c
left a law practice about eight years ago to work in education. i didn't consider whether i would work for a for-profit or nonprofit. i thought i want to go someplace and make a difference. i want to be a part of the solution. i took a pay cut to do that. people at learn it, i hard to hear quotes like that immediately for-profit is only stakeholder is the vest are tore or stockholder. for us at learn it we talk about we two bottom lines. we have an academic bottom line and financial bottom line and we can't fail on either. so we're very focused on student achievement and focused on making sure we're meeting the needs of those stakeholders which are the students, the families, the schools, the principals that we serve. so unfortunately i can't answer that exact question but i have to tell you we're here in this business because we want to make a difference and we're passionate about education. >> michael? to the point raquel just made, a skeptic of for-profits being involved in education, might say, well that is nice, if your heart is in the right place, okay but at the end of the day,
be settled according to established law. his remark is seen as a way of countering china's claim of sovereignty over the senkaku islands in the east china sea. the philippine president appealed for cooperation in resolving territorial disputes. he said the philippines has consistently called for peaceful solutions under international rules. vietnamese prime minister also urged that territorial disagreements be solved by international law. the philippines, vietnam, and china have been engaged with disputes over islands in the south china sea, including the spratly islands. but chinese prime minister left laos before the regional issues began. >>> up next, "in depth." >>> china's top political and military leaders are meeting in beijing for the 18th communist party congress. over the next week, the elite who control a nation of 1.3 billion people, will reflect on the past and chart a course for the future. here's an in-depth look on what's happening now in china. 2,200 delegates from across the country gathered inside the great hall of the people. they were chosen from more than 80
of the secular progressive movement is to destroy tradition, like marital laws. in france, they're attacking those who want to keep marriage between a man and woman. just because you didn't get the visuals, those are phony nuns wearing habits and they were topless, i guess. that's because there was some people, catholic people demonstrating for traditional marriage. so could those things happen here? they might have already happened with the occupy wall street movement. here now, alan colmes and monica crowley and you say? >> absolutely. it's not just recent, this stuff has been happening for decades. we all bill ayers, owl wall street, van jones, code pink during the iraq war. this stuff -- this is the left. what you're seeing, these are the radicals of the left. this happens all across western societies and they've got one objective, which is disruption. it's all about tearing down and destroying so that they can then turn around and rebuild their -- >> bill: isn't there a difference between an antiwar movement, which is fairly intense, and gay marriage? right now who -- look atare the the
, i cannot give that to you. because actually, by law, by law, the secret service have to protect the president, first lady, and the family. and in our day -- daddy was vice president, and that is when they changed the law. imagine what it would have been like if they had not changed the law. at that time, it was just the president. and the law was changed to include the vice president. imagine what it would have been like in dallas. but lucy did not get her day free from the secret service. >> she could get almost anything but not that. you had many unique experiences. i believe the only prom held in the white house and one of the very few weddings. >> it was very exciting. as a matter of fact, the previous big wedding was alice longworth. princess alice, they called her. in our day, she was the cat's meow in washington. she said -- she had a pillow that said "if you do not have anything nice to say to anybody, come and sit next to me." [laughter] she was wonderful to listen to as long as she wasn't saying anything bad about you. but she came to our wedding. i mean, she was fasci
of next year that is built into the current law, the so-called fiscal clef. the automatic tax increases and spending cuts that make up the fiscal cliff absent of offsetting changes proposes a substantial threat to the recovery. indeed by the reckoning of the congressional budget office, the cbo, and that of many outside observers, a fiscal shock of that size would send the economy toppling back into the recession. second, early in the new year it will be necessary to improve and increase in the federal and debt limit to avoid any possibility of a catastrophic default on the nation's treasury securities and other obligations. as you recall the threat of default in the summer of 2011 fueled the economic uncertainty even though an agreement was ultimately reached. the failure to reach an agreement this time around can impose an even heavier economic and financial cost. as the fiscal policy makers face these decisions with the two objectives in mind, first as i think it is widely appreciated by now, the federal budget is on an unsustainable path. the budget deficit which peaked at about 10%
constitutional law. host: does fighting cyber crime violate the law? caller: the bill that is actually being passed to create cyber police or cyber security -- this deal that created violates the constitutional laws. host: we have a couple of bills on the table, but we also seeing the white house. we mentioned that the president has asked for the military to act more aggressively. guest: obviously, i do not have all of the details on this particular bill because it is classified. however, i can tell you, have spent nine years until the military. i have been a part of a lot of operations. in every case, the legal opinion was always an issue that was never passed over to ensure that not just u.s. citizens' rights were in storage but also the rights of the international. i cannot comment on the bill. i have not seen it. i can tell the historically i have never come across a situation where the law was something that was ignored. host: the reason you have not seen it is because it is a secret directive that this point. "the washington post" goes on to say -- give us a sense of how the government
. so i instructed my campaign treasurer to file papers with the election law enforcement commission to seek re-election. and so -- >> there you have it. christie has been extremely hands on in dealing with the storm damage. that has helped fuel a huge spike in his approval ratings which now hover around 80%. >>> in dewitt county, illinois, reluctantly agreed to a coin flip 14 days after their election ended in a tie. incumbent ferguson called tails. decisive coin flip was more like gambling than democracy, he says. >>> crane on fire starts to collapse with hundreds of people standing below in australia. now we're learning about a connection between that crane and another crane that buckled in new york after superstorm sandy. [ female announcer ] imagine skin so healthy, it never gets dry again. can your moisturizer do that? [ female announcer ] dermatologist recommended aveeno has an oat formula, now proven to build a moisture reserve, so skin can replenish itself. that's healthy skin for life. only from aveeno. anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet
the state may be missing out on millions of dollars because of how that law was written. >>> a new crackdown on internet counterfeiters. 132 international websites were shut down today. >> jaymee: c.e. said they were -- ice said that count fitters send shabby merchandise, or often fail to fill the order at all. >> organized criminals looking to take advantage of unsuspecting consumers to make a quick buck. >> congress returned today from its thanksgiving break with the country still headed toward that fiscal cliff. republicans are pressing the white house for a list of long- term spending cuts. democrats still want to raise income taxes on the rich. so far there is little outward signs the two sides are are closer to heading off the automatic tax increases and spending cuts economists have said could push the economy into another recession. the dow dropped 42 points today. the nasdaq was up by 9. the s&p closed by by 2. >>> a carbon monoxide scare that sent four people to the hospital in san francisco may have been a false alarm. for instance fire facers were called to a -- san francisco fi
but by harnessing every element of american power, military intelligence, diplomatic law enforcement, financial, economic, and above all, the power of our values as americans. al qaeda has long sought to operate in areas beyond the reach of effective security and governance. after being left on the sidelines of the momentous changes that swept through the arab world last year, they are now seeking to take advantage of the transition period to gain new sanctuary, to incite violence, and to sow instability. we know that al qaeda, its affiliates and adherents are looking to establish a foothold in other countries in the middle east and north and west africa including al qaeda in the islamic nigreb and nigeria. the international community and regional partners share concern about mali where al qaeda affiliated groups have taken control of territories in the and pose an emerging threat. we are also concerned about libya where violent extremists and affiliates of al qaeda attacked and killed innocent americans in benghazi. respect to that attack, let me be clear, we will work with the libyan governme
essentially would rid the south of all jim crow laws that were oppressing people of color. that became the civil rights act of 1964. lyndon johnson was very much in support of that act. he had been opposed to some civil rights legislation early in his life when he was the representative here in texas. but as he said very pointedly, when he became president in the well-known speech, now that i have the power, i need to use it. never expected to be the president of the united states. he has to realize he's going to run over a lot of the senators and a lot of the representatives with whom he worked when he was in the house and senate. one of them was richard russell. his friend and mentor. a giant senator from the state of georgia who vehemently opposed the civil rights act of 1964. he knows he's going to have run over him to get this passed. and they have a very somber conversation. russell says lbj, you know, you can pass the sack. you have the legislative ability to do it. jack kennedy in, but you do. but i'm warning you, if you do, you will lose the democratic party to the south. you
's social and law and order conservatives, who are concerned about preserving america's unique culture and the maintenance of social order. to these conservatives the presence of large numbers of people in the united states and in violation of american law is inherently problematic. what's more, many of them aren't wild about the influx of large numbers of illegal immigrants either, arguing that any culture needs sufficient time for new arrivals to assimilate and that cultures can benefit from periodic pauses in immigration. now, there's some other camps as well, for example, moral and social conservatives, such as some in the catholic church and other religious groups who favor what might be called a light-touch approach to immigration on what they believe are social justice grounds. but the broader point is there is a deep tension and division on the right on immigration, and there has been for decades now. the recent presidential election has brought the immigration issue once again to the center of american politics. governor mitt romney received a small percentage of latino and as
said that we should return to the clinton era tax law. just think of that era we had. we had a budget surpluses. and we had a winning prosperity. i do not think we need to fear returning to the clinton tax law. and as the caller said from texas, the democrats have demonized the bush tax cuts. and so we will see with the demon is. the 47% who do not pay income tax from about 30% of them will return to the tax rolls. and at least the pain is like to be spread around here to everybody. and i find the connection of the grover norquist problem is that if we returned to the clinton tax law, then everybody next year will just want to reduce taxes and the republicans will be free to vote for those things without the pledge interfering with that. i think what would solve that issue as well. so i think we would all be a lot better off. more dollars over 10 years. and it would come from every american. we have a huge problem here. and by the president's position of and not willing to dip below $250,000, is just as impractical as grover norquist's no tax pledge. i find the president's position ju
took an oath to abide by the laws of this state and our constitution here and the constitution of the united states. i'm on the spot here, you know. i've taken an oath to do that. and you know what our laws are. >> yes, i understand that. now we have a -- >> we have a statute that was enacted a couple of weeks ago stating that no one who had been convicted of a crime or with a criminal action against him would not be eligible. and that's our law and it seems like the court of appeals didn't pay attention to that. >> well, of course the problem is, governor, that i've got my responsibility, just like you have yours, and my responsibility, of course is -- >> i realize that, and i appreciate that so much. >> here's the thing, governor. the attorney general can talk to mr. watkins tomorrow. what i would like to do is to try to work this out in an amicable way. we don't want a lot of people down there getting hurt. it's very easy -- >> let me say this. calling me and others all over the state wanting to bring 500, and 200. >> i know. well, we don't want to have a lot of people getti
detail. >> what you make me proud as a former law professor of what a law professor can do. you have done tremendous things for the case of marriage equality. my question follows up on your notion of marriage pluralism. my former colleague says marriage is two things -- a standard form contract that establishes certain kinds of liberal basic rights but also a sanctification. constituting form. she argues in liberal state has no business sanctifying relationships and that will be ought to be doing is be establishing, dis-establishing marriages altogether. do you see that 20 years and now when you give this talk will not even use the word marriage? >> it depends a william e. my liberal. if you are a libertarian liberal, as the cato institute is, they would say yes. if you are more of the state should create conditions for human flourishing, the answer is not simple. here is what i will say more broadly. one of the easy mistakes of the whole debate is an over investment in lesbian and gay people on marriage and family lot generally. most people who are in relationships are in relationships b
employment law land serving on naacp denver and colorado boards. in the mid-50's his father threatened to cut off his college tuition if he did not end his political involvement. as howard remembered it my dad put a couple of checks on the dining room table. the checks for the next year's tuition and said get out of activism and you can have those checks. and this is what howard did. i tore them up in his face, and that was the end of my college education, and it was at that time that howard became a labor activist. howard moved to san francisco in 1967, with his lover, roger. he continued to work in the antiwar movement as a organizer in opposition to the vietnam war and staff organizer for the national peace coalition. his efforts and those of other progressive activists to bring into the movement -- to bring labor into the movement were very successful when the northern california labor councils were the first to actually oppose the vietnam war. with the rise of an organized movement in the gay community in the early 1970's, howard founded the bay area gay liberation inkn 1975, which was t
♪ >> a reading from the book of exodus. moses was keeping the flock of his father-in-law. he led his flock beyond the wilderness and came to the mountain of god. the angel of the lord appeared to him and a flame of fire out of a bush. he looked, and the bush was blazing, yet it was not consumed. and then moses said, i must turn aside and look at this great site and see why the bush is not burned up. when the lord saw that he had turned aside to see, god called to him out of the bush. moses, moses. and he said, here i am. and then god said, come no closer. remove the sandals from your feet. the place on which you are standing is holy ground. he said further, i am day god -- the god of your father, the god of abraham, the god of isac, and the god of jacob. -- god of isaac, and the god of jacob. and moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at god. then the lord said, i have observed the misery of my people who are in egypt. i have heard their cries on account of their taskmasters. i know their sufferings. i have come to deliver them from the egyptians. and to bring them up out of that land, to
who had physician cal maturity but not emotional maturity. we invented hools and child labor laws and it took forty years to create the word teenager. that was invented by somebody in their 60's but the main lesson is these stages of life were responses to problems. they were solutions. and it's ironic that it was stanley hall himself, the inventor of youth who proposed twenty years later a stage between midlife and old age arguing that he had actually made a mistake. he should have invented this stage for people like himself. he promptly passed away a year later but in writing about this period, he had asset of beautiful images and insights which make a lot of sense almost 100 years later. he described this period as an indian summer. and he said human beings didn't reach the height of their capacity until the shad dozen slanted eastward. the idea was more and more people were reaching a point where they had the benefits of experience and the capacity to do something with it. there was a book a couple of years ago that described the key traites of this period as active wisdom. i
tried to withhold this information on the ground that it concerned law enforcement, and i challenged that in court, and the court ruled that, no, this is not law enforcement. the evidence shows that the fbi was abusing its powers in an effort to get clark cur removed because fbi officials disagreed with his politics and his campus policies. >> not everybody loved j. edgar hoover. [laughter] >> i'm peter dale scott, and i wanted to ask a question about -- [inaudible] but first i have a comment for steve jacobson in the back. if there were 200 people together in a meeting, you can be absolutely certain that some of them were informants, and if i was one, i would have attacked the idea that aoki -- that the fbi could have recruited aoki. [applause] now, my question is about intel pros in the bay area. i regret that i haven't read your book yet, although i certainly will. as a point of person privilege in a bay, i was looking at co-intel documents, i was on the cuba committee, but there were copies distributed to other files, and one of the files i remember -- i've not been able to rotat
to pass new laws or exchange existing laws and also improve changing. the group includes attorney, educators and healthcare workers. >>> the future of the giants' star closer, brian wilson, up in the air after ten years in the giants' organization. friday is the deadline to offer contracts for the players. otherwise they become free agents. there are reports that the giants have not planned to offer wilson a contract. even if wilson becomes a free agent, though, he could still end up re-signing with the giants. >>> giants' players are getting a record share for winning the world series. $23.5million. each playler will receive $337,000, breaking the mark set in 2006 when the st. louis cardinals received $16 million. even melky cabrera gets his share despite his 50-game suspension. that's because he was on the team and was eligible to play. >> it pays to win the world series. >> it does. >>> 7:24. let's go back to tara. you have a lot of things going. you will be waiting an extra ten minutes. right now we're gonna head to 280 in san jose. look at this. we don't normally see this at
that if it could not pass that two-part test, then it should not become a law in the united states of america. he passed a comprehensive energy plan off the floor of this house. protected social security, advanced so many other issues. a in my opinion, tip o'neill was the elder -- was the albert einstein of politics. he knew what it took in order to make this institution work. he knew what it took to reach across the aisle, to find people of good will, to make this chamber work and to advance the agenda for this country. so for for me, it's a great honor to be here because buildings, as we name them, also embody that person. it is my hope that as people walk in and out of this building for the 21st century, that they think about who tip o'neill was. they think about, yes, how much he loved political war, but at the same time he brought his own personal warmth to that, that it was not separated here on the house floor. it is my hope in naming this building perhaps this process this great institution, can be an nated by his great legacy and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempo
, the first lady, and the family. when daddy was vice president, that is when they changed the law. imagine what it would have been like if they had not change the law. the law was changed to include the vice president. lucy did not get her day free from the secret service. >> anything but not that. you have both had many unique experiences. i believe the only prom held in the white house and a few weddings. >> it was very exciting. the previous a big wedding was longworth. princess alice they called her. in our day, she was the cat's meow. she had a pillow that says if you do not have anything nice to say about anybody, come and sit next to me. [laughter] she was wonderful to listen to as long as she was not telling you anything bad about you. she came to our wedding. she was fascinating. imagine teddy roosevelt's daughter. talk about a rebel. suzanne and i were just pussycats. her father said, you may not smoke under my roof. so she smoked on the roof. [laughter] she has a little green snake that was called emily spinach, which he put on her shoulder. mind you, you are talking about 1910
the law, isn't it? >> dana: to go to the bathroom at wal-mart? in the aisle, yeah. bob, no wonder. >> eric: god! >> bob: can i make a point here? >> greg: he thought it was a bathroom and it was a refrigerator. >> bob: wal-mart. >> dana: walk inform freezers. >> bob: 1.4 million employees and pay average of $11 an hour. you can't live on that wage. >> andrea: yes, you can. >> bob: really? you couldn't get out of bar on that. >> bob: i lived on $300 every two weeks. when i was in the peace corps. that is different. >> greg: my point is people can live on $11. it lived on a couple of bucks. in some parts of the country you can. not even lives in manhattan. >> eric: nearly 75% of wal-mart management team members began an hourly employees. sorry, in 2011, nearly 180,000 associates receive promotions. 53% of them were women. they seem to be doing evening by the book according to the capitalism. >> dana: i can see why the workers want other things. anytime you are an employee anywhere you would like to have something they mentioned like more predictable schedules. maybe that is something that ma
the workers comp. >> and that's not right or wrong. it happens to be the law. >> i'm interested in your conversations as i always found with the national football league have the same situation. >> i'm not speaking for the national football league. >> the great thing under our cpa is the cost of workers conversation is actually borne by the players. so we live in a world under the cba with the insurance cost is basically estimated every year and that is a benefit that goes to the team. so the good news that these for our football teams and i'm always worried i'll say something good about nfl owners, but this is one of them. when it comes to the cost of insurance is something reimbursed. the world we live in the mix is somewhat ironic as even though costs are reimbursed, the teams nonetheless finds that workers comp, which is interesting. i could probably choose another word other than interesting, but it's a family show. i'm always interested in this issue of workers compensation, but going back to these big ideas, recognizing when our players get hurt, our leadership refuses to call it
could not overturn any law he has issued since taking power in june. opposition protesters have called for a sit-in in tahir jair while the muslim brotherhood said they will stage nationwide demonstrations in support of morsi's plans. >>> as the truce holds between hamas and israel for if fourth day, president mahmoud abbas is confident. palestinian factions are supporting the effort but the others are opposing it. >>> finally lotto fever. lottery officials say there were no winners in last night's power lottery pushing this week's jackpot to under $425 million. that's the largest jackpot ever for the game. those are your top stories. now back to "fareed zakaria gps." >>> we live in a borderless world, right, where globalization, inper dependence, and economics are reshaping the way companies and countries cooperate. not quite, says robert kaplan. he's written a book called "the revenge of geography: what the map tells us about coming conflicts and the battle of flight." >> he joins me now. you have this terrific book out. explain what the premise is. mine i tried to very briefly do it
you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. >>> now for our "what in the world" segment. with president obama's visit to asia and war in gaza, they have been focused on the far east and middle east. let's not forget the surprising developments in the region we share a 2,000-mile border with, latin america. i just read a new world bank report -- yeah, that is what i do in my spare time -- and it has some important findings. between the years 2003 and 2009, nearly 50 million people joined latin america's middle class. that's twice the entire population of the state of texas and the sixth of america's population as a whole. in those six years, the size of the region's middle class expanded by 50%. the proportion of people in poverty fell sharply from 44% to 30%. and as the rest of the world became more unequal, latin america was the only region to decrease the gap between rich and poor. the findings have important consequences locally, but also for the world. when china lifted hundreds of milli
of the -- one of the underpinnings is a rules-based system. a respect for the rule of law. in addition to accountability to the people who elect you. canada has tremendous attachment and affection and over the largest part of the arctic. there are certain special obligations that come with that, stored ship of the environment. we have enormous interest in our own resources and our people. 40% of canadian land mass is above the 50th parallel, yet we only health -- have 100,000 of our people living there. is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty. you mentioned a search and rescue. at this time of year, but there are 24 hours a day and temperatures plummet below 50 degrees celsius. you have open waters and changes that are born to create a lot of challenges because more people are simply going to go there and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others who want to be a part of this arctic council. to your question about the obligation to, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and res
, individuals, came from above, came from the nature's god or the laws of nature or the creator, and that if they came from above, then the hand of a king nor the hands of a mob could take it away. >> well said. >> that is what -- that's why they are sacred and unviolent. and without that -- >> it's worth reading about. john, it's worth reading. the name of the book is "thomas jefferson: the art of power." and he once said the whole art of politics is the art of telling the truthle. i'll never forget that one. thank you, jon meacham. a great book for christmastime. >>> when we return, let me finish with the best first step that president obama should take for successful second term. you're watching "hardball," a place for politics. i love the holidays. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpkin pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as... -[ man ] 1... -[ wo
: this jewelry came from my late husband's family. and as far as i believe, my father-in-law's grandmother was nanny to queen alexandra and edward vii's children or lord and lady knollys' children. and lady charlotte knollys was lady-in-waiting to queen alexandra. well, fantastic, and there's plenty of evidence - to back that up, isn't there? - oh, yes. i mean, these magnificent little presentation brooches are a sort of little march through her career. this is the cipher of queen alexandra, - the double "a," isn't it? - yes, that's right. under the royal crown, and so perhaps this was a christmas present. and maybe that's a birthday present and yet another one. and this dear nanny would wear them with enormous pride. i'm absolutely sure. these two, actually, made her swell with pride even more. have you thought at all about the date, 1902, why that would be so special? it's the coronation of edward vii. - that's right. - certainly this dear mrs. martin, the nanny, would have shared in the great drama that surrounded the coronation of edward vii. and so i believe the people who went to tha
that are in the bracelet. probably 15 years ago or so, my sister-in-law, who had the earrings, she sold those to me. okay. this is called sporting motif jewelry. it's a reverse crystal bracelet. and the technique is really interesting. the jeweler actually takes a piece of rock crystal that's been rounded and smoothed out and he carves it from behind. he carves out the exact image and then it's painted from behind as well. at that point, it's backed with mother of pearl. so you can see a little bit of the shine behind the actual crystal-- that is mother of pearl. and then it's joined together with a stirrup strap and this snaffle bit, which is a really great motif. so it's all in keeping with the actual piece. we've got a hound dog, we've got a horse, a fox and completed with the other two at the end as well. when we go to appraise these, we always take a look at the quality of the carving and how well it's done and executed. the detail on the dog and the little whiskers are really crisp. i can tell you've taken really good care of it. it's in really good condition. reverse crystal can get scratched easi
lawyer fresh out of law school, went to work for the house committee working to impeach him, so he knew where she was coming from with regard to her view toward him. and he had a less than positive view toward her based primarily on her watergate experiences but also based upon what he perceived as her uncompromising liberal views. he thought that bill clinton would be more inclined to compromise than she would be. but nixon also had a high respect for people with great intelligence, and there was no doubt in his mind but that mrs. clinton is very smart. he just thought -- and the problem for nixon was that mrs. clinton believed in the wrong things, and that's bigger government. but nixon was also a very fair man, and when mrs. clinton did things right, and when she was good and strong and effective, he said so. but when she was wrong, which was most of the time for nixon, he said so. and an illustration of this, which i think this puts it in great light is when mrs. clinton did go to testify about the health care reform package she had put together. and he watched her testify, as you s
and will hit the ground and there is a law that says that and simply because there's some idiot out let there who claims t apples float. so, no, objectivity does not mean taking one of this side and one of that side and presenting both for the audience to select. your job as a journalist is precisely to go out, to do the reporting and then as i said earlier on, to analyze it, to separate the wheat from the chaff, to put it into a proper context and if the overwhelming scientific community or if the scientific community overwhelmingly says there is global warming, do you give a nod in the direction of some other intelligent voice? yes, why not, but not, you know, you certainly don't do it on the basis of equal time. >> and that first one, the pressure first was directed at the networks to be objective and fair, what they would do, as you remember, they would put a republican up here for 30 seconds and a democrat here for 30 seconds and then they were being objective and they felt they were telling the story but they never got at the essence of objectivity as i think you have so well desc
was keeping the flock of his father-in-law. he led his flock beyond the wilderness and came to the mountain of god. the angel of the lord appeared to him and a flame of fire out of a bush. he looked, and the bush was blazing, yet it was not consumed. and then moses said, i must turn aside and look at this great site and see why the bush is not burned up. when the lord saw that he had turned aside to see, god called to him out of the bush. moses, moses. and he said, here i am. and then god said, come no closer. remove the sandals from your feet. the place on which you are standing is holy ground. he said further, the god of your father, the god of abraham, god of isaac, and the god of jacob. and moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look at god. then the lord said, i have observed the misery of my people who are in egypt. i have heard their cries on account of their taskmasters. i know their sufferings. i have come to deliver them from the egyptians. and to bring them up out of that land, to a good and broad land. on land flowing with milk and honey. to the country of the canaanites, the
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